How putting employees first boosts your brand

If a company treats its employees well, what does that say about a brand?

Recent studies show that consumers are more likely to purchase from brands if employees are treated well. Further, they may even be willing to pay more and recommend the company’s products or services to friends. Should a business aim to bolster its brand through better worker policies and practices? If you’ve ever experienced the challenges of recruiting and retaining great people at your organization, a better question might be: can you really afford not to?

A study conducted in 2016 with Cone Communications  intereviewed 1,000 adults uncovering some compelling data on what motivates employees, and it’s not just about financial gain. About 85% were looking at making a meaningful difference through their career. About 76% were looking for meaningful personal experiences, such as meeting new people and exploring new places. Breaking down the survey data looking at the Millennial segment responses, a full 79% consider a company’s social and environmental commitments when deciding where to work. They are also more likely to be loyal when they feel they can make a positive impact on issues at work.

79% of Millennials consider social and environmental commitments when deciding where to work Click To Tweet

When a brand takes a stand and is not shy to share its environmental and social commitments, this goes a long way toward attracting and retaining great employees. It attracts consumers and influences their purchases. A study on global corporate responsibility showed that 84% percent of consumers consider a company’s social commitments, including employee treatment, before deciding what to buy or where to shop, and 82 percent consider them when it comes to which products and services to recommend to friends.

Leading Brands: B Corporation examples

To find examples of how leading brands put employees first, I looked at certified BCorps, a network of over 2,000 companies that aim to use business as a force for good. Assessed by a third party, these companies are ranked on their policies and actions related to governance, workers, community and the environment.

Beau’s All Natural Brewing, based just outside of Ottawa, has had incredible year-over-year growth since its inception in 2006. At its 10-year anniversary, the company announced that it would sell the brewery to its employees, shifting to 100% employee ownership. The company decided that keeping the operation independent and Canadian owned was important and it wanted employees to have a shared responsibility in the company’s future and plans for expansion across Canada.

Fairware provides promotional products to North America’s leading change makers. Every product meets the company’s strict environmental and social standards while manufacturers are held to a code of conduct. Fairware’s 12-person team is based in Vancouver and 100% of its employees are paid living wage. It also covers 80% of individual and family health insurance premiums. The company culture reflects its commitment to community and the environment. At its a bike-friendly office in a 100-year old building, the team hosts monthly collective lunches and happy hour with some of the local breweries around the corner in East Vancouver.

Outdoor retailer Patagonia was a pioneer in on-site childcare, being one of the first companies in California to offer it. It extends health care benefits to part-time, retail, and warehouse staff with 80% coverage of health insurance premiums for full-time workers. About 50% of full time employees participate in external professional development, an important incentive that encourages loyalty.

There is a strong business case for investing in your employees and going beyond the bare minimum mandated in our national and provincial employment laws. To build a respected and trusted brand that people love, you need to look within and ensure your employees respect and trust your organization.

Whistler Open Forum Event February 1

Learn more about how putting employees first boosts your brand at the February 1 Whistler Open Forum. Here’s what we’ll cover in this evening session:

  • Clarify how your brand is a reflection of your employees along with the benefits of building synergy between them.
  • How a ‘living wage’ impacts our local communities and why it is considered one of the best local economic development strategies businesses can implement.
  • Ideas on best practices for small and medium sized businesses that you can use to optimize your recruitment and training dollars for an effective retention strategy.

Don’t miss out on the chance to build a stronger brand. Register today.

Open Forum Event

REGISTER FOR THE WHISTLER OPEN FORUM

Confident Communications Tools

Confidence-Building Tools that Move Ideas into Action

Game-changing communications skills

Brands created with purpose have inspiring stories to tell. Beyond selling a product or service, these types of brands may have a purpose focused on improving society, making lives easier and healthier, or tackling an environmental problem. Often, it’s easy to frame an elevator pitch around what you do, but this misses the chance to connect with people at an emotional level. Strategic marketer Simon Sinek’s research shows how companies that ‘start with why’ instead of ‘what’ are more likely to succeed and build strong, trusted brands. With the right confidence-building tools, business leaders can reframe how they communicate purpose, moving their ideas forward into action.

“People don’t buy what you do. They buy why you do it.”  Simon Sinek, Start With Why

Sharing brand purpose confidently helps attract and connect with the ideal target audience. Once they learn about the brand’s purpose and connect with it, consumers are more likely to engage and trust these brands. Effective communication skills and the ability to speak with confidence are also essential for business success. Communicating confidently can build loyalty, strengthen reputation, gain exposure, and attract the right partners to increase profit.

How would your business change if you could confidently share your brand purpose during meetings, one-on-ones, sales presentations, or even informal conversations?

On February 24, join Communications Trainer and Professional Coach Lucas Mattiello at the Whistler Open Forum Event for a presentation and hands-on workshop to learn:

  • What causes fear around public speaking + how to remove it
  • How to think less + connect more
  • Top 3 mistakes speakers make that destroy trust + how to avoid them
  • Self-awareness triggers to manage nervous feelings + negative thoughts
  • What you MUST focus on to address your client’s pain points

Event Details – SOLD OUT!

Date/Time:  Wednesday, February 24 from 5:30 to 8:00 p.m. (Check-in from 5:30 p.m., speaker starts at 6 p.m.)
Location:  Squamish Lil’wat Cultural Centre, Whistler, BC
Tickets: $35 + GST, includes: inspiring speaker, fun networking opportunities, tasty appetizers, fabulous door prizes, cash bar and more!
Event Hosts: Lighthouse Visionary Strategies, Local Whistler, Seeds Consulting.

Check back for the next Whistler Forum Event. Date TBD

Game-changing communications skills

More about Lucas

Lucas is a Vancouver-based Communications Trainer and Certified Professional Coach who educates business professionals on techniques and strategies to become confident communicators. Using his personal experiences of living with anxiety and panic disorder, Lucas has empowered clients and corporations with proven self-management tools that eliminate stress, build confidence and elevate your message. He has been featured in Forbes Magazine and numerous news shows, is a best selling author, and his corporate clients include Vancouver Coastal Health, the City of Burnaby and others.

Crystal Brown Photography

Lean on Me: Support for Small Business Owners to Navigate the Road Ahead

Lessons from the Whistler Open Forum

Getting an enterprise off the ground is a great accomplishment. Once a business venture gets traction to grow or become a market leader, entrepreneurs are often faced with a crossroad. When business owners are uncertain which path to choose, advice and mentorship can break down barriers and offer clarity.

Small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) are cornerstones of the Canadian economy. According to a BDC study, successful SMEs have a few things in common: these businesses innovate, ask for outside advice and have a plan to measure progress. The entrepreneurs behind the most successful SMEs don’t figure everything out on their own, they often reach outside of their core team, circle of friends and family to find unbiased and industry-specific support for the next phase of their business.

During Small Business Week, the Whistler Open Forum showcased these local leaders to share personal stories of how mentorship and partnership helped them dream bigger and accomplish more than they ever thought possible.

The power of partners and mentors

A few years ago, Louise and Bob Van Engelsdorp had a vision to bring Epsom salt float pods to Whistler. A new trend at the time, this sensory deprivation experience required a large capital investment but was a tough sell for a typical lending institution. After hearing about non-profit Community Futures Howe Sound, Louise called to pitch her idea. They coached her to a stronger business plan and soon after, a deal was struck and West Coast Float opened its doors in December 2013. For Louise, the road to becoming an entrepreneur has been full of twists and turns, but Community Futures has continued to provide invaluable mentorship and guidance along the way.

When Nicolette Richer made the leap from policy developer to entrepreneur, she did so with a clear vision, solid business plan and an incredible amount of energy fueled by green juice. The Green Moustache moved forward using her own savings, creative bootstrapping, a retail partnership with 3 Singing Birds and an investment from Futurpreneur. Over the last two decades, non-profit Futurpreneur has provided financing, mentoring and support tools to aspiring business owners aged 18 through 39 across Canada. With their advice, Nicolette expanded to a second location in Vancouver and is collaborating with an expert to accelerate growth across North America through a franchise model.

Co-Founders Joe Facciolo and Skai Dalziel already had a successful business, Whistler Tasting Tours, when they decided to pivot from hospitality into the tech sector with Guusto, a mobile platform that sends food or beverage gifts to your contacts at restaurants in over 250 Canadian cities. Starting with investment and mentorship from Futurpreneur and additional coaching from a tech accelerator, the entrepreneurs then became the first BC-based company to successfully raise funds through equity crowdfunding. Unlike traditional crowdfunding that solicits donations, equity crowdfunding involves startups selling shares directly to investors so Guusto’s early adopters and loyal customers can have a stake in the game. Next up for Joe and Skai: making a pitch for further investment on CBC’s Dragon’s Den November 11.

Sometimes, entrepreneurs need another set of eyes to see the road ahead. These made-in-Whistler successes are textbook examples of how small businesses can launch and thrive with the right level of partnership, investment and mentorship.

Have an idea for a business networking event we should host in Whistler? Contact us and we’ll see if we can line it up at the next Whistler Open Forum.